North Korea: Guam residents seemingly unalarmed by escalating nuclear crisis

North Korea: Guam residents seemingly unalarmed by escalating nuclear crisis

North Korea: Guam residents seemingly unalarmed by escalating nuclear crisis

Updated 14 August 2017, 13:35 AEST

Caught in the centre of a burgeoning military crisis, residents of the tiny Pacific island of Guam seem unalarmed by Kim Jong-un's threat to put them in the crosshairs of his ballistic missiles.

Caught in the centre of a burgeoning military crisis, residents of the tiny Pacific island of Guam seem unalarmed by the threat of a North Korean missile strike.

Key points:

  • Concerns of a nuclear attack have prompted the Guam Government to stockpile fresh water and offer advice sheets
  • North Korea lies just 3,000 kilometres from Guam, and missile tests prove they have the ability to strike the US territory
  • But Guam locals are "not afraid", instead putting their trust in the country's military personnel

Last week, North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un threatened to launch missiles into the sea around the remote US territory, prompting the authorities on Guam to put out an advice sheet telling locals what to do in the event of a nuclear attack.

President Donald Trump said the United States stood behind Guam "1,000 per cent" and predicted tourism would see a boost as a result of the nuclear threats.

And while the chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff is today expected to meet South Korea's President to discuss growing tensions with Pyongyang, on the pristine beaches of Guam concerns of a North Korean attack seem like a world away.

"Me and my family feel safe, and I know that Guam and the US got a big military base, and with our military people they will defend our country," said local RayJohn Lizama.

For Mr Lizama, who has lived in Guam his whole life, Pyongyang's threats are nothing new.

"We're just having a good time, not taking things too serious, but always be cautious as well, you know?

"So that's how me and my family feel about North Korea."

'I'm not afraid as many people think we're afraid'

Guam is home to several US military bases covering almost a third of the island, and its economy depends in large part on US defence installations.

But North Korea, with its increasingly sophisticated arsenal of long-range missiles, lies perilously close at just over 3,000 kilometres away.

The Guam Government is not taking any chances, urging its 160,000 residents to stockpile fresh water and to make sure they know where to take shelter in the event of a missile strike.

Recent North Korean missile tests have proven the rogue nation now has the ability to strike this remote and strategically important US territory.

Despite this, Keandra McDonald, a student at Guam University, said she was not worried.

"I'm not afraid as many people think we're afraid. Life just goes on and we have trust and confidence in God and our military," Ms McDonald said.

"They could [attack] but we have so much defence, we have so much military personnel around the country around the world and around the peninsula.

"So if they could attack, I don't think it would get very far".