Superfood harvest of quinoa and chia underway in Kimberley's Ord Stage 2

Superfood harvest of quinoa and chia underway in Kimberley's Ord Stage 2

Superfood harvest of quinoa and chia underway in Kimberley's Ord Stage 2

Updated 7 September 2017, 6:50 AEST

The company developing stage two of the Kimberley's Ord Irrigation Scheme gets this year's harvest off to a very "healthy" start.

The company developing stage two of the Kimberley's Ord Irrigation Scheme is off to a very "healthy" start to its 2017 harvest.

Kimberley Agricultural Investment (KAI) has grown a variety of crops across more than 2,600 hectares this year with most of its land dedicated to the trendy foods — quinoa and chia.

"After a late start [to planting] because of that massive wet season we had, we've turned it around into a reasonable result and are pretty happy," KAI's farm manager Luke McKay said.

"These two crops are well suited to Kununurra and the value is there for us to invest our time into growing them."

Mr McKay said the grains would be stored locally and then if all goes to plan, would be processed and packaged through KAI's own processing plant next year for export.

"We'll be sending plenty of trendy food their way [to China]," he said.

This is KAI's third year of harvesting since being named preferred developer of Ord Stage 2 back in 2012.

KAI's cotton vision takes shape in 2018

KAI is continuing to develop the Ord Stage 2 land parcel known as Goomig, and expects to have more than 4,000 hectares of crops in the ground next year.

The company planned to once again grow quinoa, chia, maize, chickpeas and sorghum but, most significantly, will have its first attempt at commercially growing cotton.

"Cotton will be the biggest change for us next year," Mr McKay said.

"Cotton is a massive gamechanger for us, the Ord, and more broadly northern Australia, and is a significant step in [our] further expansion.

"It's a very exciting process to be involved in with the planning and very soon the implementation of that crop next year."

Following on from successful trials in the Ord this year, KAI aims to plant cotton during the end of the wet season and then, once harvested, quickly plant a fast-growing mung bean crop afterwards.

KAI is also in the process of seeking approvals to develop another 3,000 hectares of freehold land on Carlton Hill Station, which it bought in 2016.