Australian Rohingya community traumatised as family members tell of atrocities in Myanmar

Australian Rohingya community traumatised as family members tell of atrocities in Myanmar

Australian Rohingya community traumatised as family members tell of atrocities in Myanmar

Updated 15 September 2017, 15:45 AEST

Members of Australia's Rohingya community are traumatised by events unfolding in Myanmar and Bangladesh as family and friends send pictures and videos of the atrocities they are suffering.

Members of Australia's Rohingya community in central Queensland are traumatised by events unfolding in Myanmar and Bangladesh as family and friends send graphic pictures and videos of the atrocities they are suffering.

Mojib Ullah lives in Rockhampton, Queensland, but three of his sisters are caught up in what he describes as the Myanmar military's attempt to obliterate his people.

"What we are learning from our family members is absolutely disturbing," Mr Ullah said.

"It is beyond our imagination."

Mr Ullah has pictures and video evidence of a dead child and a dead elephant under water in a paddy field and another of a burnt, dead child.

He also has been sent photographs of a child's body floating underwater as well as pictures of decapitated adults, burnt bodies, slaughtered animals and burnt-out villages.

The ABC was shown the photographs, but chose not to publish them due to their graphic nature.

One of Mr Ullah's sisters lived in Tulatuli, a village in the district of Maungdaw in the Rakhine state.

Taking shelter in the mountains

She fled to the mountains and watched as the military rolled in and attacked.

Mr Ullah said that was on August 25.

When she returned, there was nothing left.

"She's now in Bangladesh at the Kutupalong refugee camp," he said.

His other two sisters also made it to Bangladesh, and Mr Ullah said he was in constant contact with other family members and friends on the ground.

"A lot of people took shelter in the mountains, escaping persecution,'' Mr Ullah said.

''They are stuck there because the military troops have been deployed everywhere and they are surrounding innocent people. They can't even go back to their villages.

"They are stuck in the mountains without food or shelter.

"They talk to us over the phone and they send us messages through WhatsApp and other apps, and they frequently ask us, 'Can you please save us, please rescue us from here'."

Mr Ullah said he and other members of the Rohingya community were struggling mentally and were traumatised by material they had received from Myanmar.

"It is absolutely hard for us to bear this pain," he said.

The Rohingya community in Rockhampton is made up of mainly single, young people and most still have family in Rakhine state.

Mr Ullah said the international community should apply pressure on Myanmar to end the genocide and take ''effective action'' against the perpetrators.

Mr Ullah's family has suffered persecution before.

As a six-year-old in 1991 he fled Myanmar with his family to Bangladesh to escape persecution.

"We Rohingya have been facing systemic genocide for seven decades. We think this is the final step of ongoing genocide,'' he said.

Suu Kyi 'offered optimism, but has lost control'

"From what I recall, the military, they kill people indiscriminately, and there is no right for Rohingya people — right of education, right of job, right of movement, right of business.

"So all of their rights, including rights of citizenship, have been hijacked by the Myanmar military."

Mr Ullah said there had been optimism and hope when Aung San Suu Kyi took over as the country's leader in April last year.

He said he did not think that she had any control over the Myanmar military.

''It isn't clear who is controlling the Myanmar Government," he said.