A look inside Indonesia's twin village, where 12 sets of twins live in close proximity

A look inside Indonesia's twin village, where 12 sets of twins live in close proximity

A look inside Indonesia's twin village, where 12 sets of twins live in close proximity

Updated 3 October 2017, 19:05 AEDT

Local Indonesian media have dubbed Perumnas Klender, a modest housing estate in East Jakarta, a twin village — with 12 sets of twins living within its 6,000 square metres.

Six-year-old identical twins Kansa and Kalisa won't perform for a camera on demand.

The sisters shunned the ABC when we visited their housing complex in East Jakarta.

Not a single photo was taken, but their screams of horror at even the thought of it could be heard down the street.

We slowly backed away feeling ashamed to have even asked.

But it mattered little, a few doors away we found another, much more cooperative set of identical twins.

The local Indonesian media have dubbed Perumnas Klender, a modest housing estate in East Jakarta, a twin village.

Twelve sets of twins live within 6,000 square metres — 10 are identical.

"It all started in 1990, there were six pairs of twins in one alley," the head of the neighbourhood, Andang Subaryono said.

"When we did the calculation in May 2014 we found 19 pairs."

Since then some have died and some have moved away, leaving 12. None are related by blood.

Athyyah Alya and Athyyah Kamila Aziza, look and dress the same.

The 12-year-olds stand awkwardly together as they speak.

They were born and raised in the neighbourhood.

"I'm happy I get to be a celebrity all the time," Athyyah Kamila said of living in the so-called twin village.

Seventeen-year-olds Riky and Riko Prawoto are being raised by their uncle and aunt on an alley within the village, where three sets of twins reside

"I called this alley of the twin," their uncle Setijoko said.

"It's a blessing from God that there are a lot of twins living here."

Rico and Riky count themselves lucky too.

"We joke and laugh together, we suffer together and we have fun together," Rico said. Or was that Riky?

So if they're not related, why do so many sets of twins live in such a small area?

There's been no study of the cluster, but the locals seem to agree there's nothing in the water.

"It's just a coincidence, there are no myths," the neighbourhood head Andang insisted.

Asmina, the mother of four-year-olds Fani and Fina, the youngest twins in the village, is not superstitious either.

"I'm happy there are many like them," she simply explained.

But our presence has upset her twins too. We insisted we'd wait, but Fani and Fina were woken from an afternoon sleep to greet us.

They were two-times grumpy and doubly unimpressed.