Andrew Forrest still positive about prospects for proposed Indo Pacific Rugby Championship

Andrew Forrest still positive about prospects for proposed Indo Pacific Rugby Championship

Andrew Forrest still positive about prospects for proposed Indo Pacific Rugby Championship

Updated 27 October 2017, 17:20 AEDT

Mining magnate Andrew Forrest is not backing away from his plans for an Indo Pacific Rugby Championship, which could be up and running within two years.

"The most popular rugby competition in the world."

This is the dream of billionaire businessman Andrew Forrest, after announcing new details for his proposed Indo Pacific Rugby Championship that he hopes to bring to fruition in the next two years.

The proposed six-team competition will run for approximately four months. There will be 10 home-and-away rounds plus finals, and a total of 33 matches.

At present, the only definite team involved will be former Super Rugby franchise the Western Force.

Forrest has already been in talks with many players, including current Wallabies.

"This [competition] is for players, it opens up options it opens up revenue it opens up the possibility that they can not have to leave our fair shores to be paid what you can in Japan or in Europe," Mr Forrest said.

"We are now going to be competitive with those international clubs … I think we have the seeds here to drive a really successful competition out of half the world's population."

Cities that have been earmarked for participation include Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Colombo, Mumbai, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Seoul, Tokyo and also the Pacific Islands of Fiji, Tonga and Samoa.

An emphasis will be placed on growing the talent bases in the countries involved, but there is also the idea of populating their teams with marquee talent.

Mr Forrest first announced he would be attempting to create the competition after the Western Force were removed from the Super Rugby tournament.

Just yesterday morning, he held a discussion with the Australian Rugby Union, and said there had been positive feedback.

"Would they like it not to happen? That certainly didn't come up. What they want is the ability to fit it in," he said.

"We've got strong encouragement from World Rugby. It's fair to say that the ARU obviously have a lot more work and a lot more thinking to do around this. This is the biggest thing to happen to Australian Rugby in a very long time, so the ARU board are really putting in the work to assess it and to optimize it for Australian rugby."

Mr Forrest will present his vision at a World Rugby board meeting next month.