Tasmanian election: Anti-abortion Labor candidate's posters spark infighting speculation

Tasmanian election: Anti-abortion Labor candidate's posters spark infighting speculation

Tasmanian election: Anti-abortion Labor candidate's posters spark infighting speculation

Updated 9 February 2018, 9:10 AEDT

The placement of a pro-life Labor politician's election posters in the windows of a recently closed abortion clinic in Hobart has not gone unnoticed, with some asking if their appearance is part of ALP infighting over the issue.

The Liberals are demanding to know whether a conservative Labor MP's campaign signage has been placed in a recently closed abortion clinic building as part of factional ALP infighting.

Several of right wing Labor MP Madeleine Ogilvie's posters have been placed in the windows of the building that until recently housed Tasmania's only dedicated surgical abortion clinic.

The Liberals want more detail.

"It's up to Madeleine Ogilvie to explain if she put the posters there or if this is part of the ongoing campaign against her from within the Labor Party," a spokesman said.

Greens leader Cassy O'Connor said it was "odd" and that she "wouldn't be surprised if Madeleine has done it deliberately".

"Women in Tasmania and certainly women in Hobart know that building was the location for a private abortion clinic and Ms Ogilvie, we know has a faith-based opposition to abortions," Ms O'Connor said.

"She is thumbing her nose a bit, if it's Madeleine who has done it, to women in Tasmania who know that in this state you can't access safe surgical terminations in the public setting and the private clinic is now gone."

At last year's Labor state conference, members of the party's dominant left faction called for Ms Ogilvie to be expelled from the party for voting against the conscience bill on euthanasia.

Candidate's views subject of Labor protests before

In 2015, the far-left rainbow Labor movement joined the Health and Community Service Union state secretary Tim Jacobson for a protest outside Ms Ogilvie's office because of her opposition to same-sex marriage.

The issue of abortion has featured in the looming state election, with Labor leader Rebecca White pledging to make terminations available through public hospitals, or invest in a standalone abortion clinic.

Ms Ogilvie is in jeopardy at the looming March 3 state election in the metropolitan seat of Denison, where she faces internal pressure from Labor candidates Ella Haddad and Tim Cox.

Ms Ogilvie was contacted for comment.