Japan urged not to revoke apology to WWII 'comfort women'

Japan urged not to revoke apology to WWII 'comfort women'

Japan urged not to revoke apology to WWII 'comfort women'

Updated 10 January 2013, 10:29 AEST

Japan's opposition is urging Prime Minister Shinzo Abe not to wind back a 20-year-old apology to women kept as sex slaves during World War Two.

Mr Abe took office last month and has previously called for a review of the landmark apology issued in 1993, known as the Kono statement.

Up to 200,000 women - mostly Korean, but also Chinese, Dutch, Japanese, Filipino, Indonesian and from elsewhere - were kidnapped and forced to work as so-called "comfort women" in brothels for Japanese soldiers.
 
But nationalists, including Mr Abe, have long resented the Kono statement, and claim that Japan did not directly coerce the women.
 
Laura Tchilinguirian spoke to Associate Professor Tina Dolgopol, who in December 2000 was one of the Chief Prosecutors for the Women's International War Crimes Tribunal held in Tokyo.
 
Presenter: Laura Tchilinguirian
 
Speaker: Tina Dolgopol, Associate Professor at the School of Law at Flinders University in Adelaide
 

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